Strong Words About APPR from The West Seneca Central and Springville-Griffith Institute Central School Boards

By | September 23, 2014

The West Seneca Central and Springville-Griffith Institute Central school boards each passed a resolution supporting a rebuttal to the New York State School Boards Association Resolution #10 to be presented on the NYSSBA Convention in late October. Resolution #10 supports the use of Student Performance Data (test scores) in Teacher Evaluations (APPR)…

The Board of Education of the West Seneca Central School District disagrees with the NYSSBA Resolution Committee Statement supporting continued use of student performance data in Annual Professional Performance Review for educators. While we share the Committee’s concern about the need for “sophisticated measures of performance” for our employees, we see a significant negative impact on our students, educators, and school district finances resulting from the new APPR regulations. The Board of Education of the West Seneca Central School District disagrees with the Resolutions Committee that the current APPR evaluation system measuring student growth using standardized testing is a valid assessment of an educator’s job performance.”

Our reasons for opposition to the resolution of support have three concerns;

  • Concern #1: Negative Student Impact:
  • Concern #2: Negative Educator Impact:
  • Concern #3: School District Financial Impact:

SUMMARY OF CONCERNS

Concern #1: Negative Student Impact:

  • Narrowing of Curriculum: Due to the high-stakes nature of the 3-8 assessment requirements tied to APPR, schools may focus primarily on the subjects of ELA and mathematics and reduce or eliminate instruction in science, history, the arts, and physical education.
  • Schools and educators may emphasize test based skills over critical thinking and creativity.
  • The teacher – student dynamic may change: “would a test score be more important than developing a well-round human being?
  • Will fewer students be placed in challenging courses for fear of lower scores?
  • Program cuts and larger class sizes result from spending on APPR system.

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